Cruise Details

7-Night Alaska

Seattle Round-Trip

Ship: Norwegian Jewel

Prices starting from:

Pricing Info
Inside Oceanview Balcony Suite

$879

$126 per night

$1,069

$153 per night

$1,799

$257 per night

$1,879

$268 per night

Norwegian Jewel - Ship Review provided by Cruise Critic


Ship Review | Cruise Line Review

Overview

Editor's note: Norwegian Jewel was initially reviewed based on our experiences onboard a seven-night Western Caribbean cruise, which included Roatan, Grand Cayman, Ocho Rios and Great Stirrup Cay -- Norwegian's private island in the Bahamas. Norwegian Jewel also sails a seven-night Eastern Caribbean itinerary with stops in Antigua and St. Thomas, 7- and 12-night Mediterranean cruises, and a 12-night cruise that features the Greek Isles and Egypt.

In the summer, the ship is based in Europe, operating 12-day Baltic cruises out of Dover, England. When we re-reviewed the ship for this update, in summer 2008, it was cruising a Baltic voyage.


Gen-Xers pump iron and practice yoga alongside baby boomers wrapped in seaweed. Nearby, kids careen down a yellow water slide while their parents soak up the sun and tropical drinks. Seniors vie for shuffleboard titles and perfect their golf swings while tots explore the kids' club.

Welcome aboard the multi-faceted Norwegian Jewel.

Jewel launched in August 2005, and on it, Norwegian Cruise Line continues to refine the Freestyle Cruising concept that's become its corporate motto. Freestyle 2.0 was introduced across the fleet in spring 2008, with several enhancements to the menus, new beds throughout and service tweaks at all levels.

On Jewel, more than 2,300 passengers enjoy the freedom to dine where, when and with whom they wish. Casual is the operative word here, with formal night optional.

The Jewel is a floating test for land-based amenities and services like high-rent luxury villas, martini and Champagne bars, interconnecting family-friendly cabins, and an electronic restaurant reservations system. No doubt, Norwegian Jewel and its younger sisters, Norwegian Pearl and Norwegian Gem, are the closest you'll ever get to a land-based resort vacation -- at least in the big-ship marketplace.

Fully loaded with so many land-based bells and whistles, the Jewel is at its best at night with passengers dispersed among its numerous restaurants, lounges and entertainment venues. In an effort not to miss any of the eateries, lounges or countless activities, I found myself rushing about the ship and frequently checking my watch. It took a conscious effort for me to slow down, block out the hubbub, and simply enjoy the splendid Caribbean views from our cabin balcony.

On the longer Baltic cruises, there's more time to experiment with the 10 different restaurants and choose your favorites for repeat visits.

In the needs-improvement department, though, the ship can do even better handling the throngs. With more than 2,000 co-passengers, I fully expected waits. But I was not prepared to stand on the dock in Roatan -- for more than 30 minutes, alongside 75 other shore excursion guests -- waiting for one tardy couple. The tender process was long -- especially transferring from the dock in Roatan back to the Jewel. Adding another metal detector and a couple more local tenders would help, and not once during the cruise could I find an empty lounge chair poolside.

Excursion loading and unloading in the Baltic was more efficient, with no tender ports and staggered excursion times. However, there was too much deck chair hogging around the pool -- even in the weak summer sun of Northern Europe -- and spare loungers were a rare find.

Ultimately, there's much about the Jewel that sparkles -- most notably the dining options, amiable crew, appealing staterooms and impressive fitness center. Though numerous restaurants, an electronic reservation system and streamlined debarkation help with crowd control, there are times (muster drill, tenders and shore excursions), when you feel the presence of your fellow shipmates. Happily, there are quiet places to read a good book and enjoy the splendid views. Deck 7 offers outdoor seating when the pool deck is packed. The library is almost always empty, and Spinnaker Lounge is sunny and quiet by day. By dinner time, the spa empties out, and you can savor the sunset from a hot tub or chaise.

Dining

The Jewel's 10 dining venues offer open seating, flexible hours and excellent service. An electronic reservations system keeps things running smoothly -- we made reservations for the week at the reservations desk upon embarkation and never had to wait more than a few minutes to be seated. Reservations can also be made by phone. It's best to book early for the specialty restaurants, especially for large parties or for smaller venues like Teppanyaki. Cancellations after 5 p.m. incur a $5 fee.

Judging from the crowds at Teppanyaki and Le Bistro, passengers don't mind paying $10 to $25 in cover charges. A few venues -- Cagney's, Chin Chin and Le Bistro -- cut their cover charge in half between 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

Complimentary hot tea, coffee, iced tea and ice water are served with meals; soft drinks, bottled water and alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge. A can of Coke costs $1.75; an unlimited soda program is $40.25.

The majority of wines onboard are from California, though the Pacific Northwest is represented, as are Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Chile and South Africa. A glass of wine runs from $5.25 (California white zinfandel) to $18 (Champagne). Bottles begin at $24 (California merlot) and climb to $135 (Bordeaux).

Surrounded by so many dining venues, it's easy to forget that 24-hour room service is also available (except on the morning of debarkation). From 6:30 a.m. until 10 a.m., you can enjoy continental fare like juice, fresh fruit, muffins and cold cereal. Lunch and dinner options include perennial favorites like chicken Caesar salad, sandwiches and pizza, plus kid-pleasers like hot dogs and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Tsar's Palace and Azura, the two main restaurants, share dinner and lunch menus with daily selections. Healthy, cooking light selections are always available, as are Caesar salad, chicken, salmon, steak, vegetables and baked potatoes. At breakfast, waiters outnumber diners at the ornate Tsar's Palace, decorated in royal hues of burgundy, green and gold with chandeliers, marbled pillars and stunning faux Faberge egg balustrades. This room is an elegant space and, with its Russian-inspired decor, is particularly appropriate to the Baltic -- flooded with light during the long evenings thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows on the aft side.

With its pop art, wood veneer and soft lighting, the smaller Azura -- a sleeker and more contemporary venue -- is also a more intimate space. But, it appeared gloomy by comparison, and the service was all over the place; my cocktail arrived with my starter, and my glass of wine came when I had nearly finished my main course. The Captain's Gala Dinner menu -- with broiled lobster tail -- was our best no-cover-charge meal.

Blue Lagoon, a pleasant food court-style venue overlooking the atrium, is another option for breakfast and lunch. For a hearty start, order the Full House -- fried or scrambled eggs, bacon, grilled tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms and hash browns. That will keep you until late lunch, which offers a menu of fish and chips, burgers, soups and salads. Garden Cafe and the Great Outdoors -- indoor and outdoor buffets -- are good for a quick breakfast or lunch but are less appealing for dinner. Passengers complained the food was inconsistent and often cold. During the day, the Garden Cafe is under a lot of pressure, and seats can be hard to find. Nice touches include a soft-serve ice cream dispenser and self-serve coffee machines that brew decaf and regular lattes and cappuccinos. For morning juices and pastries or burgers and hot dogs for lunch, the poolside grill is quick and convenient.

Cagney's Steakhouse ($15 cover charge), which sports cowhide chairs and western decor, serves filet mignon, strip loin, New York cut, boneless rib eye and T-bone steaks.

Chin Chin ($10 cover charge), the main area of an Asian fusion complex, offers starters like dim sum and satay, followed by miso or tom yum soup, and entrees like chili mussels in lemongrass coconut milk, chicken curry and pad thai. Save room for Thai banana pancakes with coconut ice cream. Knives and salt shakers go flying at the hibachi-style Teppanyaki (cover charge $25; half price for children). Entrees include combinations of chicken, beef and seafood (including lobster) served with miso soup, ginza salad, vegetables and garlic fried rice. Entrees are followed by ice cream or fresh fruit. California and New York rolls, barbecued eel and flying fish roe are among the selections at the Sushi Bar ($2 per order, $8 to $13 for sushi and sashimi combos).

NCL's signature restaurant, Le Bistro ($15 cover charge), may not have the original Impressionist art found on Norwegian Dawn, but it still gets our vote for best restaurant with a cover charge. The service is especially attentive and the food presentation memorable. Don't miss the decadent chocolate fondue with fruit, served in a half-pineapple. A jazz brunch served here on a sea day ($15) received rave reviews from my traveling companions.

At the rustic Mama's Italian Kitchen ($15), you can create your own pizza or pasta with sauces ranging from traditional (tomato, Alfredo and Bolognese) to haute (shrimp with lemon and basil or smoked salmon with white wine cream and chives). Another $15 venue, Tango's Tex-Mex and Tapas Bar & Restaurant , serves good margaritas and south-of-the-border fare, including hot and cold tapas, prawn fajitas, and sopapillas with a tapas menu in a separate seating area. The hip Java Cafe in the atrium brews fabulous coffee drinks -- cappuccino, espresso and frozen coffee, served with delectable pastries -- for a fee.

Public Rooms

There's nothing subtle about the Jewel's public rooms. Imagine "Finding Nemo" meets "Austin Powers." After a couple days of sensory overload, your brain adjusts, and the decor starts to look normal. Smoking is not permitted in the show lounges or indoor restaurants, but it is allowed in the casino, Corona cigar club and on outside decks. Fortunately, there are helpful directories inside and outside the three elevator banks.

Deck 7 is home to the bustling shore excursion and reception desks, Internet cafe, art and photo galleries, and enormous galleria and port of call retail space for duty-free items. The Crystal Atrium features a trendy Java Cafe and elegant, white, baby grand piano.

The Internet cafe, open 24 hours a day, has eight computer stations. After an account activation fee of $3.95, the basic charge is $0.75 per minute. Frequent users do better with package rates: 250 minutes for $100 or 100 minutes for $55.

The Library's wood burl shelves are lined with a good selection of self-help, sports, travel, science, history, fiction and children's titles in multiple languages. Passengers can check out three books at a time (except travel and reference). Despite stunning views, gold decor, floor globe and orchids, most guests find the straight-backed, box-shaped chairs simply too uncomfortable. There's also a DVD library (a well-kept secret) for passengers in suites, although we brought our own portable DVD player and were allowed to borrow from it.

Cabins

From standard insides to balcony suites, interconnecting cabins to luxurious villas with butler and concierge service, the Jewel offers a tremendous variety of living quarters. All cabins are furnished with cherry wood finishing, televisions, refrigerators, safes, duvets, and bathrooms with showers and hair dryers.

In-cabin Internet access is available with an Ethernet cable. (Our connection wasn't working initially and had to be established through the Internet manager). TV programming includes a rotating selection of movies, as well as CNN, TNT, Cartoon Network and ESPN. Ship-to-shore calls from the cabin to the U.S. run $5.95 per minute. Mobile phones are another option, thanks to a roaming network, with rates determined by home carriers. (Europeans should note that all calls are routed via Bermuda, and the charges are enormous.)

Suites and penthouses on Decks 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14 (272 square feet and larger) feature glass doors with private balconies. Most suites have queen-size beds, separate living areas with dining tables, bathrooms with showers and tubs, and excellent concierge service. Oceanview staterooms with balconies on Decks 8, 9 and 10 (200 - 205 square feet) offer sets of two chairs on private balconies. Oceanview staterooms on Decks 4, 5, and 8 (150 - 161 square feet) include picture windows or portholes.

Our balcony stateroom on Deck 10 was cheerful and welcoming, decorated in vibrant Caribbean hues. An orange and purple love seat and blue drapes combined to create an appealing space. Mirrors outside the bath, beside the closet, and above the beds helped to create a spacious feel. A pair of plastic chairs on the balcony was practical, but unexciting.

A mini-suite on Deck 11 was more conventional, with a burgundy sofa bed -- separated from the main sleeping area by a thick drape -- and metal balcony furniture. Those cabins also had the added benefit of a bathtub.

With our luggage tucked under the twin beds, we found the closet space sufficient with a convenient safe, shelves and shoe storage. The well-stocked mini-bar had everything from Veuve Clicquot Champagne to Wild Turkey and Grand Marnier. Reading lamps over each bed worked well, and there were two power points (110v) -- adequate for most but tricky when you have two Nintendos, one laptop, one DVD player, three cameras and two cell phones!

The tropical theme continued in the well-designed bathroom with shell-shaped lamps and aquamarine, mosaic floor tiles. Separate toilet and shower areas (with a handy Elemis shampoo and soap dispenser, Elemis moisturizer and retractable clothes line for wet bathing suits) flanked a central white sink and vanity with ample shelf space. Kudos to our amiable housekeepers who never failed to freshen the cabin, turn down the beds and fill our ice bucket.

Families can choose from about 300 interconnecting cabins in a range of categories, from standard insides to suites. Different grades of cabins can be linked to create two- to five-bedroom areas for immediate families, extended families and family reunion groups.

If you're craving a butler and concierge, as well as your own piano, hot tub and silver toothbrush holder, look no further. The Jewel offers 10 stylish horizon villas and two 5,000-square-foot garden villas. In addition to the ritzy decor and furnishings, the luxe digs share a lounge with Internet access, a private sun deck and a gorgeous central courtyard, featuring a retractable roof, rattan sun beds, swimming pool, hot tub, treadmill and Stairmaster.

Entertainment

Boredom is not an option onboard Norwegian Jewel. The challenge is choosing from among numerous daytime activities that include foreign language, cooking and dancing classes, trivia contests, lectures on handwriting, perfume seminars, bingo, art auctions, arts and crafts, volleyball, ping pong, tennis and human chess play, as well as checkers, bridge and Scrabble. There is also a martini clinic and margarita tasting for $15.

The Stardust Theatre is the main entertainment venue for nightly Broadway- and Vegas-style productions, comedy and magic acts, and a Cirque du Soleil-style aerial thriller -- Cirque Bijou. The fearless troupe includes gymnasts, acrobats and bungee jumpers. They played to a packed house.

In addition to the evening extravaganza, live guitar and piano music is performed at various venues. For night owls, there are late parties with themes like White Nights (attendees dress all in white), Caribbean and disco.

Karaoke and Nintendo Wii are available, both at the futuristic FYZZ Lounge and the private red, green or blue karaoke rooms at no extra charge.

Among the 13 bars and lounges is a central hub called Bar City, which consists of a Champagne and wine bar with pink art deco neon signage and a see-through wall decoration that features water bubbling throughout it. Also located there are a martini bar with zebra-striped chairs and large screen displaying James Bond-like female silhouettes, as well as a whiskey and beer pub. Despite the stylishness of the watering holes, some passengers grumbled about the cost of bar drinks. A beer runs $3.95 to $6.50. The cocktail of the day is $7.95. Fruit smoothies cost $8.95 with alcohol, $6 without. The cheapest glass of chardonnay -- Alderbrook from Russian River -- costs $6.50.

The Jewel Club Casino offers gaming lessons and slot machine, blackjack and poker tournaments. Passengers also watched the Super Bowl on a big screen TV and placed bets. Games include one penny to $100 slot machines, baccarat, roulette and blackjack.

From adventurous canopy zip-line tours (in the Caribbean) to sedate sightseeing trips (in the Baltic), shore excursions cover all the bases, including a new level of ultra-exclusive tours by private car or minibus. For security reasons, all bags go through a metal detector on return to the ship, and any duty-free items acquired are confiscated until the end of the cruise.

While the morning tender to Great Stirrup Cay -- NCL's private island in the Bahamas -- was well-orchestrated with timed tickets, the afternoon wait to and from the island on one large tender proved achingly slow. On the Baltic itinerary, there aren't any tender ports, so this wasn't an issue.

Fitness and Recreation

The popular pool deck has two pools, four whirlpools with colorful awnings, and a bright yellow waterslide for kids.

Body Waves Fitness Center, Deck 12, is open 24/7 for gym rats. With glorious ocean views from floor-to-ceiling windows and individual televisions, you can almost forget you're exercising. The fitness center sports the latest weight machines, cardiovascular equipment and free weights, plus a separate room for fitness classes. Aerobics and stretch classes are gratis; step, Pilates and yoga cost $15, and in the Baltic, four 55-minute spinning classes cost $40.

Bora Bora Health Spa & Beauty Salon, Deck 12, is a tranquil place to enjoy exotic treatments -- from algae detox and lime and ginger salt glows to coconut rubs and milk ritual wraps -- at exotic (a k a expensive) prices. The hard sell of skincare products following treatments can rub you the wrong way. Robes and towels are supplied; bring your own shower sandals. In the changing rooms, there's a sauna, steam room, rest area and showers with an abundant supply of Elemis shower gel and shampoo.

Other recreational options include a jogging and walking track and a versatile sports deck with bleacher seating that accommodates basketball, volleyball and tennis. There are also two golf driving nets, a shuffleboard court, ping pong tables and a pair of life-sized "Alice in Wonderland"-like chess sets.

Family

Norwegian Jewel rolls out the welcome mat for families, with amenities like interconnecting cabins, a kids-only pool and water slide, and an appealing Splashdown Kid's Club. In addition to a children's menu, young passengers can enjoy the Kid's Corner buffet with mini stools, low tables, and kid-pleasing fare like hot dogs and chicken nuggets. Families can gather in the card room for a game of Monopoly or Clue or sing together during family karaoke night.

The Kid's Crew program is organized by age group: Junior Sailors (2 - 5), First Mates (6 - 9), Navigators (10 - 12) and Teens (13 - 17). In addition to the play room, the Splashdown Kid's Club features a kid cinema and video arcade. Age-appropriate activities range from lego-mania and silly songs for the younger crowd to a sports afternoon and survivor night for tweens. Club Underground is the teen hangout, with a juice bar, touch-screen jukebox, Microsoft Xbox gaming consoles, disco nights, socials and movies.

The facilities are superb, but what I hadn't realized at the time of booking was that the kids' clubs are not free, except on sea days. Until 7 p.m. on all port days, there is a charge of $5 per child, per hour ($8 for two siblings), whether parents are ashore or onboard; it seems unsatisfactory in a destination like the Baltic where families may only be ashore for half of the day (St Petersburg, for example, where the ship spends two days). Clubs are also not segregated into age groups when the ship is in port. On sea days, there is only a charge in the evenings, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Unlike many other at-sea children's programs which start at age 3, NCL takes tots as young as 2. Appreciative parents are issued beepers for diaper changes and other emergencies.

Fellow Passengers

In the Caribbean, the majority of passengers are American. The balmy, Caribbean weather also attracts Brits looking to escape the winter cold. The ship, with its whirlwind of activities and impressive amenities, enjoys a broad appeal across age groups. Children and teens are out in force during school holidays.

In the Baltic, there is a complete international mix, the major groupings being British, American, Canadian and Spanish, followed by smaller groups from places as diverse as Malta, South America, the Caribbean and Hong Kong.

Dress Code

Casual dress is a very popular aspect of freestyle cruising. Formalwear (black tie or dark suit for men and evening gown or cocktail dress for women) is optional during one formal evening. On our trip, about a quarter of passengers got dolled up in gowns and tuxedos. Even in the ship's most elegant restaurant, Le Bistro, diners donned resort casual attire -- which translates into polo shirts and khakis for men and sun dresses or skirts and blouses for women. After 5:30 p.m., jeans, T-shirts, shorts, tank tops and bare feet are not permitted in the restaurants.

Gratuity

Each passenger is automatically billed $10 per day, which supports an incentive program for the service staff. (Children, ages 3 - 12, are charged $5 per day.) Guests who prefer to tip individually can fill out a form at reception. A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to fitness classes and bar drinks or 18 percent in the spa. For passengers using concierge and butler service, NCL recommends a gratuity "commensurate with the services rendered." The bill can be paid in cash or with credit cards or traveler's checks.

--by Susan Jaques. Updated by Sue Bryant.

Dining

The Jewel's 10 dining venues offer open seating, flexible hours and excellent service. An electronic reservations system keeps things running smoothly -- we made reservations for the week at the reservations desk upon embarkation and never had to wait more than a few minutes to be seated. Reservations can also be made by phone. It's best to book early for the specialty restaurants, especially for large parties or for smaller venues like Teppanyaki. Cancellations after 5 p.m. incur a $5 fee.

Judging from the crowds at Teppanyaki and Le Bistro, passengers don't mind paying $10 to $25 in cover charges. A few venues -- Cagney's, Chin Chin and Le Bistro -- cut their cover charge in half between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Complimentary hot tea, coffee, iced tea and ice water are served with meals; soft drinks, bottled water and alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge. A can of Coke costs $1.75; an unlimited soda program is $40.25.

The majority of wines onboard are from California, though the Pacific Northwest is represented, as are Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Chile and South Africa. A glass of wine runs from $5.25 (California white zinfandel) to $18 (Champagne). Bottles begin at $24 (California merlot) and climb to $135 (Bordeaux).

Surrounded by so many dining venues, it's easy to forget that 24-hour room service is also available (except on the morning of debarkation). From 6:30 a.m. until 10 a.m., you can enjoy continental fare like juice, fresh fruit, muffins and cold cereal. Lunch and dinner options include perennial favorites like chicken Caesar salad, sandwiches and pizza, plus kid-pleasers like hot dogs and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Tsar's Palace and Azura, the two main restaurants, share dinner and lunch menus with daily selections. Healthy, cooking light selections are always available, as are Caesar salad, chicken, salmon, steak, vegetables and baked potatoes. At breakfast, waiters outnumber diners at the ornate Tsar's Palace, decorated in royal hues of burgundy, green and gold with chandeliers, marbled pillars and stunning faux Faberge egg balustrades. This room is an elegant space and, with its Russian-inspired decor, is particularly appropriate to the Baltic -- flooded with light during the long evenings thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows on the aft side.

With its pop art, wood veneer and soft lighting, the smaller Azura -- a sleeker and more contemporary venue -- is also a more intimate space. But, it appeared gloomy by comparison, and the service was all over the place; my cocktail arrived with my starter, and my glass of wine came when I had nearly finished my main course. The Captain's Gala Dinner menu -- with broiled lobster tail -- was our best no-cover-charge meal.

Blue Lagoon, a pleasant food court-style venue overlooking the atrium, is another option for breakfast and lunch. For a hearty start, order the Full House -- fried or scrambled eggs, bacon, grilled tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms and hash browns. That will keep you until late lunch, which offers a menu of fish and chips, burgers, soups and salads. Garden Cafe and the Great Outdoors -- indoor and outdoor buffets -- are good for a quick breakfast or lunch but are less appealing for dinner. Passengers complained the food was inconsistent and often cold. During the day, the Garden Cafe is under a lot of pressure, and seats can be hard to find. Nice touches include a soft-serve ice cream dispenser and self-serve coffee machines that brew decaf and regular lattes and cappuccinos. For morning juices and pastries or burgers and hot dogs for lunch, the poolside grill is quick and convenient.

Cagney's Steakhouse ($15 cover charge), which sports cowhide chairs and western decor, serves filet mignon, strip loin, New York cut, boneless rib eye and T-bone steaks.

Chin Chin ($15 cover charge), the main area of an Asian fusion complex, offers starters like dim sum and satay, followed by miso or tom yum soup, and entrees like chili mussels in lemongrass coconut milk, chicken curry and pad thai. Save room for Thai banana pancakes with coconut ice cream. Knives and salt shakers go flying at the hibachi-style Teppanyaki (cover charge $25; half price for children). Entrees include combinations of chicken, beef and seafood (including lobster) served with miso soup, ginza salad, vegetables and garlic fried rice. Entrees are followed by ice cream or fresh fruit. California and New York rolls, barbecued eel and flying fish roe are among the selections at the Sushi Bar ($15 for all you can eat).

NCL's signature restaurant, Le Bistro ($15 cover charge), may not have the original Impressionist art found on Norwegian Dawn, but it still gets our vote for best restaurant with a cover charge. The service is especially attentive and the food presentation memorable. Don't miss the decadent chocolate fondue with fruit, served in a half-pineapple. A jazz brunch served here on a sea day ($15) received rave reviews from my traveling companions.

At the rustic Mama's Italian Kitchen ($10), you can create your own pizza or pasta with sauces ranging from traditional (tomato, Alfredo and Bolognese) to haute (shrimp with lemon and basil or smoked salmon with white wine cream and chives). Another $10 venue, Tango's Tex-Mex and Tapas Bar & Restaurant , serves good margaritas and south-of-the-border fare, including hot and cold tapas, prawn fajitas, and sopapillas with a tapas menu in a separate seating area. The hip Java Cafe in the atrium brews fabulous coffee drinks -- cappuccino, espresso and frozen coffee, served with delectable pastries -- for a fee.

Gratuity

Each passenger is automatically billed $12 per day, which supports an incentive program for the service staff. Passenger who prefer to tip individually can fill out a form at reception. A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to fitness classes and bar drinks or 18 percent in the spa. For passengers using concierge and butler service, NCL recommends a gratuity "commensurate with the services rendered." The bill can be paid in cash or with credit cards or traveler's checks.

--by Susan Jaques. Updated by Sue Bryant.

Dining

The Jewel's 10 dining venues offer open seating, flexible hours and excellent service. An electronic reservations system keeps things running smoothly -- we made reservations for the week at the reservations desk upon embarkation and never had to wait more than a few minutes to be seated. Reservations can also be made by phone. It's best to book early for the specialty restaurants, especially for large parties or for smaller venues like Teppanyaki. Cancellations after 5 p.m. incur a $5 fee.

Judging from the crowds at Teppanyaki and Le Bistro, passengers don't mind paying $10 to $25 in cover charges. A few venues -- Cagney's, Chin Chin and Le Bistro -- cut their cover charge in half between 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

Complimentary hot tea, coffee, iced tea and ice water are served with meals; soft drinks, bottled water and alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge. A can of Coke costs $1.75; an unlimited soda program is $40.25.

The majority of wines onboard are from California, though the Pacific Northwest is represented, as are Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Chile and South Africa. A glass of wine runs from $5.25 (California white zinfandel) to $18 (Champagne). Bottles begin at $24 (California merlot) and climb to $135 (Bordeaux).

Surrounded by so many dining venues, it's easy to forget that 24-hour room service is also available (except on the morning of debarkation). From 6:30 a.m. until 10 a.m., you can enjoy continental fare like juice, fresh fruit, muffins and cold cereal. Lunch and dinner options include perennial favorites like chicken Caesar salad, sandwiches and pizza, plus kid-pleasers like hot dogs and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Tsar's Palace and Azura, the two main restaurants, share dinner and lunch menus with daily selections. Healthy, cooking light selections are always available, as are Caesar salad, chicken, salmon, steak, vegetables and baked potatoes. At breakfast, waiters outnumber diners at the ornate Tsar's Palace, decorated in royal hues of burgundy, green and gold with chandeliers, marbled pillars and stunning faux Faberge egg balustrades. This room is an elegant space and, with its Russian-inspired decor, is particularly appropriate to the Baltic -- flooded with light during the long evenings thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows on the aft side.

With its pop art, wood veneer and soft lighting, the smaller Azura -- a sleeker and more contemporary venue -- is also a more intimate space. But, it appeared gloomy by comparison, and the service was all over the place; my cocktail arrived with my starter, and my glass of wine came when I had nearly finished my main course. The Captain's Gala Dinner menu -- with broiled lobster tail -- was our best no-cover-charge meal.

Blue Lagoon, a pleasant food court-style venue overlooking the atrium, is another option for breakfast and lunch. For a hearty start, order the Full House -- fried or scrambled eggs, bacon, grilled tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms and hash browns. That will keep you until late lunch, which offers a menu of fish and chips, burgers, soups and salads. Garden Cafe and the Great Outdoors -- indoor and outdoor buffets -- are good for a quick breakfast or lunch but are less appealing for dinner. Passengers complained the food was inconsistent and often cold. During the day, the Garden Cafe is under a lot of pressure, and seats can be hard to find. Nice touches include a soft-serve ice cream dispenser and self-serve coffee machines that brew decaf and regular lattes and cappuccinos. For morning juices and pastries or burgers and hot dogs for lunch, the poolside grill is quick and convenient.

Cagney's Steakhouse ($15 cover charge), which sports cowhide chairs and western decor, serves filet mignon, strip loin, New York cut, boneless rib eye and T-bone steaks.

Chin Chin ($10 cover charge), the main area of an Asian fusion complex, offers starters like dim sum and satay, followed by miso or tom yum soup, and entrees like chili mussels in lemongrass coconut milk, chicken curry and pad thai. Save room for Thai banana pancakes with coconut ice cream. Knives and salt shakers go flying at the hibachi-style Teppanyaki (cover charge $25; half price for children). Entrees include combinations of chicken, beef and seafood (including lobster) served with miso soup, ginza salad, vegetables and garlic fried rice. Entrees are followed by ice cream or fresh fruit. California and New York rolls, barbecued eel and flying fish roe are among the selections at the Sushi Bar ($2 per order, $8 to $13 for sushi and sashimi combos).

NCL's signature restaurant, Le Bistro ($15 cover charge), may not have the original Impressionist art found on Norwegian Dawn, but it still gets our vote for best restaurant with a cover charge. The service is especially attentive and the food presentation memorable. Don't miss the decadent chocolate fondue with fruit, served in a half-pineapple. A jazz brunch served here on a sea day ($15) received rave reviews from my traveling companions.

At the rustic Mama's Italian Kitchen ($15), you can create your own pizza or pasta with sauces ranging from traditional (tomato, Alfredo and Bolognese) to haute (shrimp with lemon and basil or smoked salmon with white wine cream and chives). Another $15 venue, Tango's Tex-Mex and Tapas Bar & Restaurant , serves good margaritas and south-of-the-border fare, including hot and cold tapas, prawn fajitas, and sopapillas with a tapas menu in a separate seating area. The hip Java Cafe in the atrium brews fabulous coffee drinks -- cappuccino, espresso and frozen coffee, served with delectable pastries -- for a fee.

Gratuity

Each passenger is automatically billed $10 per day, which supports an incentive program for the service staff. (Children, ages 3 - 12, are charged $5 per day.) Guests who prefer to tip individually can fill out a form at reception. A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to fitness classes and bar drinks or 18 percent in the spa. For passengers using concierge and butler service, NCL recommends a gratuity "commensurate with the services rendered." The bill can be paid in cash or with credit cards or traveler's checks.

--by Susan Jaques. Updated by Sue Bryant.

Overview

Gen-Xers pump iron and practice yoga alongside baby boomers wrapped in seaweed. Nearby, kids careen down a yellow water slide while their parents soak up the sun and tropical drinks. Seniors vie for shuffleboard titles and perfect their golf swings while tots explore the kids' club.

Welcome aboard the multi-faceted Norwegian Jewel.

Jewel launched in August 2005, and on it, Norwegian Cruise Line continues to refine the Freestyle Cruising concept that's become its corporate motto. Freestyle 2.0 was introduced across the fleet in spring 2008, with several enhancements to the menus, new beds throughout and service tweaks at all levels.

On Jewel, more than 2,300 passengers enjoy the freedom to dine where, when and with whom they wish. Casual is the operative word here, with formal night optional.

The Jewel was a floating test for land-based amenities and services like high-rent luxury villas, martini and Champagne bars, interconnecting family-friendly cabins, and an electronic restaurant reservations system. No doubt, Norwegian Jewel and its younger sisters, Norwegian Pearl and Norwegian Gem, offer an experience akin to a land-based resort vacation.

Fully loaded with so many land-based bells and whistles, the Jewel is at its best at night with passengers dispersed among its numerous restaurants, lounges and entertainment venues. In an effort not to miss any of the eateries, lounges or countless activities, I found myself rushing about the ship and frequently checking my watch. It took a conscious effort for me to slow down, block out the hubbub, and simply enjoy the splendid Caribbean views from our cabin balcony.

In the needs-improvement department, though, the ship can do even better handling the throngs. With more than 2,000 co-passengers, I fully expected waits. But I was not prepared to stand on the dock in Roatan -- for more than 30 minutes, alongside 75 other shore excursion guests -- waiting for one tardy couple. The tender process was long -- especially transferring from the dock in Roatan back to the Jewel. Adding another metal detector and a couple more local tenders would help, and not once during the cruise could I find an empty lounge chair poolside.

Excursion loading and unloading in the Baltic was more efficient, with no tender ports and staggered excursion times. However, there was too much deck chair hogging around the pool -- even in the weak summer sun of Northern Europe -- and spare loungers were a rare find.

Ultimately, there's much about the Jewel that sparkles -- most notably the dining options, amiable crew, appealing staterooms and impressive fitness center. Though numerous restaurants, an electronic reservation system and streamlined debarkation help with crowd control, there are times (muster drill, tenders and shore excursions), when you feel the presence of your fellow shipmates. Happily, there are quiet places to read a good book and enjoy the splendid views. Deck 7 offers outdoor seating when the pool deck is packed. The library is almost always empty, and Spinnaker Lounge is sunny and quiet by day. By dinner time, the spa empties out, and you can savor the sunset from a hot tub or chaise.

Dining

The Jewel's 10 dining venues offer open seating, flexible hours and excellent service. An electronic reservations system keeps things running smoothly -- we made reservations for the week at the reservations desk upon embarkation and never had to wait more than a few minutes to be seated. Reservations can also be made by phone. It's best to book early for the specialty restaurants, especially for large parties or for smaller venues like Teppanyaki. Cancellations after 5 p.m. incur a $5 fee.

Judging from the crowds at Teppanyaki and Le Bistro, passengers don't mind paying $10 to $25 in cover charges. A few venues -- Cagney's, Chin Chin and Le Bistro -- cut their cover charge in half between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Complimentary hot tea, coffee, iced tea and ice water are served with meals; soft drinks, bottled water and alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge. A can of Coke costs $1.75; an unlimited soda program is $40.25.

The majority of wines onboard are from California, though the Pacific Northwest is represented, as are Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Chile and South Africa. A glass of wine runs from $5.25 (California white zinfandel) to $18 (Champagne). Bottles begin at $24 (California merlot) and climb to $135 (Bordeaux).

Surrounded by so many dining venues, it's easy to forget that 24-hour room service is also available (except on the morning of debarkation). From 6:30 a.m. until 10 a.m., you can enjoy continental fare like juice, fresh fruit, muffins and cold cereal. Lunch and dinner options include perennial favorites like chicken Caesar salad, sandwiches and pizza, plus kid-pleasers like hot dogs and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Tsar's Palace and Azura, the two main restaurants, share dinner and lunch menus with daily selections. Healthy, cooking light selections are always available, as are Caesar salad, chicken, salmon, steak, vegetables and baked potatoes. At breakfast, waiters outnumber diners at the ornate Tsar's Palace, decorated in royal hues of burgundy, green and gold with chandeliers, marbled pillars and stunning faux Faberge egg balustrades. This room is an elegant space and, with its Russian-inspired decor, is particularly appropriate to the Baltic -- flooded with light during the long evenings thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows on the aft side.

With its pop art, wood veneer and soft lighting, the smaller Azura -- a sleeker and more contemporary venue -- is also a more intimate space. But, it appeared gloomy by comparison, and the service was all over the place; my cocktail arrived with my starter, and my glass of wine came when I had nearly finished my main course. The Captain's Gala Dinner menu -- with broiled lobster tail -- was our best no-cover-charge meal.

Blue Lagoon, a pleasant food court-style venue overlooking the atrium, is another option for breakfast and lunch. For a hearty start, order the Full House -- fried or scrambled eggs, bacon, grilled tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms and hash browns. That will keep you until late lunch, which offers a menu of fish and chips, burgers, soups and salads. Garden Cafe and the Great Outdoors -- indoor and outdoor buffets -- are good for a quick breakfast or lunch but are less appealing for dinner. Passengers complained the food was inconsistent and often cold. During the day, the Garden Cafe is under a lot of pressure, and seats can be hard to find. Nice touches include a soft-serve ice cream dispenser and self-serve coffee machines that brew decaf and regular lattes and cappuccinos. For morning juices and pastries or burgers and hot dogs for lunch, the poolside grill is quick and convenient.

Cagney's Steakhouse ($15 cover charge), which sports cowhide chairs and western decor, serves filet mignon, strip loin, New York cut, boneless rib eye and T-bone steaks.

Chin Chin ($15 cover charge), the main area of an Asian fusion complex, offers starters like dim sum and satay, followed by miso or tom yum soup, and entrees like chili mussels in lemongrass coconut milk, chicken curry and pad thai. Save room for Thai banana pancakes with coconut ice cream. Knives and salt shakers go flying at the hibachi-style Teppanyaki (cover charge $25; half price for children). Entrees include combinations of chicken, beef and seafood (including lobster) served with miso soup, ginza salad, vegetables and garlic fried rice. Entrees are followed by ice cream or fresh fruit. California and New York rolls, barbecued eel and flying fish roe are among the selections at the Sushi Bar ($15 for all you can eat).

NCL's signature restaurant, Le Bistro ($15 cover charge), may not have the original Impressionist art found on Norwegian Dawn, but it still gets our vote for best restaurant with a cover charge. The service is especially attentive and the food presentation memorable. Don't miss the decadent chocolate fondue with fruit, served in a half-pineapple. A jazz brunch served here on a sea day ($15) received rave reviews from my traveling companions.

At the rustic Mama's Italian Kitchen ($10), you can create your own pizza or pasta with sauces ranging from traditional (tomato, Alfredo and Bolognese) to haute (shrimp with lemon and basil or smoked salmon with white wine cream and chives). Another $10 venue, Tango's Tex-Mex and Tapas Bar & Restaurant , serves good margaritas and south-of-the-border fare, including hot and cold tapas, prawn fajitas, and sopapillas with a tapas menu in a separate seating area. The hip Java Cafe in the atrium brews fabulous coffee drinks -- cappuccino, espresso and frozen coffee, served with delectable pastries -- for a fee.

Gratuity

Each passenger is automatically billed $12 per day, which supports an incentive program for the service staff. Passenger who prefer to tip individually can fill out a form at reception. A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to fitness classes and bar drinks or 18 percent in the spa. For passengers using concierge and butler service, NCL recommends a gratuity "commensurate with the services rendered." The bill can be paid in cash or with credit cards or traveler's checks.

Dining

The Jewel's 10 dining venues offer open seating, flexible hours and excellent service. An electronic reservations system keeps things running smoothly -- we made reservations for the week at the reservations desk upon embarkation and never had to wait more than a few minutes to be seated. Reservations can also be made by phone. It's best to book early for the specialty restaurants, especially for large parties or for smaller venues like Teppanyaki. Cancellations after 5 p.m. incur a $5 fee.

Judging from the crowds at Teppanyaki and Le Bistro, passengers don't mind paying $10 to $25 in cover charges. A few venues -- Cagney's, Chin Chin and Le Bistro -- sometimes have early bird deals.

Complimentary hot tea, coffee, iced tea and ice water are served with meals; soft drinks, bottled water and alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge (pretty standard onshore bar prices).

Surrounded by so many dining venues, it's easy to forget that 24-hour room service is also available (except on the morning of debarkation). From 6:30 a.m. until 10 a.m., you can enjoy continental fare like juice, fresh fruit, muffins and cold cereal. Lunch and dinner options include perennial favorites like chicken Caesar salad, sandwiches and pizza, plus kid-pleasers like hot dogs and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Tsar's Palace and Azura, the two main restaurants, share dinner and lunch menus with daily selections. Healthy, cooking light selections are always available, as are Caesar salad, chicken, salmon, steak, vegetables and baked potatoes. At breakfast, waiters outnumber diners at the ornate Tsar's Palace, decorated in royal hues of burgundy, green and gold with chandeliers, marbled pillars and stunning faux Faberge egg balustrades. This room is an elegant space and, with its Russian-inspired decor, is particularly appropriate to the Baltic -- flooded with light during the long evenings thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows on the aft side.

With its pop art, wood veneer and soft lighting, the smaller Azura -- a sleeker and more contemporary venue -- is also a more intimate space. But, it appeared gloomy by comparison, and the service was all over the place; my cocktail arrived with my starter, and my glass of wine came when I had nearly finished my main course. The Captain's Gala Dinner menu -- with broiled lobster tail -- was our best no-cover-charge meal.

Blue Lagoon, a pleasant food court-style venue overlooking the atrium, is another option for breakfast and lunch. For a hearty start, order the Full House -- fried or scrambled eggs, bacon, grilled tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms and hash browns. That will keep you until late lunch, which offers a menu of fish and chips, burgers, soups and salads. Garden Cafe and the Great Outdoors -- indoor and outdoor buffets -- are good for a quick breakfast or lunch but are less appealing for dinner. Passengers complained the food was inconsistent and often cold. During the day, the Garden Cafe is under a lot of pressure, and seats can be hard to find. Nice touches include a soft-serve ice cream dispenser and self-serve coffee machines that brew decaf and regular lattes and cappuccinos. For morning juices and pastries or burgers and hot dogs for lunch, the poolside grill is quick and convenient.

Cagney's Steakhouse ($25 cover charge), which sports cowhide chairs and western decor, serves filet mignon, strip loin, New York cut, boneless rib eye and T-bone steaks.

Moderno Churrascaria ($20) is a Brazilian-style steakhouse that offers a expansive lineup of skewered meat, including lamb chops, filet mignon, sausage and chicken. There's also the obligatory salad bar featuring international cheeses, dried meats, olives and marinated veggies, alongside the traditional salad ingredients. Sides, including mashed potatoes, fried bananas, and rice and beans, are served with the meat.

Chin Chin ($15 cover charge), the main area of an Asian fusion complex, offers starters like dim sum and satay, followed by miso or tom yum soup, and entrees like chili mussels in lemongrass coconut milk, chicken curry and pad thai. Save room for Thai banana pancakes with coconut ice cream. Knives and salt shakers go flying at the hibachi-style Teppanyaki (cover charge $25; half price for children). Entrees include combinations of chicken, beef and seafood (including lobster) served with miso soup, ginza salad, vegetables and garlic fried rice. Entrees are followed by ice cream or fresh fruit. California and New York rolls, barbecued eel and flying fish roe are among the selections at the Sushi Bar ($15 for all you can eat).

NCL's signature restaurant, Le Bistro ($20 cover charge), may not have the original Impressionist art found on Norwegian Dawn, but it still gets our vote for best restaurant with a cover charge. The service is especially attentive and the food presentation memorable. Don't miss the decadent chocolate fondue with fruit, served in a half-pineapple. A jazz brunch served here on a sea day ($15) received rave reviews from my traveling companions.

At the rustic Mama's Italian Kitchen ($10), you can create your own pizza or pasta with sauces ranging from traditional (tomato, Alfredo and Bolognese) to haute (shrimp with lemon and basil or smoked salmon with white wine cream and chives).

Family

Norwegian Jewel rolls out the welcome mat for families, with amenities like interconnecting cabins, a kids-only pool and water slide, and an appealing Splashdown Kid's Club. In addition to a children's menu, young passengers can enjoy the Kid's Corner buffet with mini stools, low tables, and kid-pleasing fare like hot dogs and chicken nuggets. Families can gather in the card room for a game of Monopoly or Clue or sing together during family karaoke night.

NCL's Splash Academy is currently divided into four age groups: Guppies (6 months to 3 years, with parent), Turtles (3 - 5), Seals (6 - 9) and Dolphins (10 - 12). The teen program, called Entourage, accommodates passengers 13 to 17. In addition to the play room, the Splashdown Kid's Club features a kid cinema and video arcade. Age-appropriate activities range from lego-mania and silly songs for the younger crowd to a sports afternoon and survivor night for tweens. Club Underground is the teen hangout, with a juice bar, touch-screen jukebox, Microsoft Xbox gaming consoles, disco nights, socials and movies.

The facilities are superb, but what I hadn't realized at the time of booking was that the kids' clubs are not free, except on sea days. Until 7 p.m. on all port days, there is a charge of $5 per child, per hour ($8 for two siblings), whether parents are ashore or onboard; it seems unsatisfactory in a destination like the Baltic where families may only be ashore for half of the day (St Petersburg, for example, where the ship spends two days). Clubs are also not segregated into age groups when the ship is in port. On sea days, there is only a charge in the evenings, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Overview

Nearly 10 years old, Norwegian Jewel has definitely lost some of its luster. But a new pub, computerized photo gallery and some funky digital signage added during a 2014 dry dock give the ship a touch of modern cred. Add to that an always-casual, laid-back ambience and a wealth of dining venues, and Norwegian Jewel is a comfortable base from which to explore any port of call.

The first of Norwegian Cruise Line's Jewel-class ships, Norwegian Jewel may lack many of the bells and whistles of its younger fleetmates (no rock wall, bowling alley or ropes course), but it's anything but boring. With dozens of daily activities, numerous lounges for live music, a waterslide on the pool deck and 10 eateries from which to choose, the variety of choices is dazzling. You'll find it all, from cheesy poolside traditions (sexiest leg contest, anyone?) and interactive game shows (the Not So Newlywed Game never gets old) to breathtaking aerial acts and a logic-defying magician in the main theater.

With so much to see and do, it's a shame to see how often the ship shows its age, particularly in the cabins and Spinnaker Lounge, where upholstery is dated. (Bold, patterned upholstery went out of style years ago.) But a brand-new dance floor in Spinnaker still makes it one of the best spots for dancing on the ship. And our cabin, while not overly large, was a comfortable handful of square inches larger than the cabins we've stayed in on most newer ships. The extra room made it slightly easier to ignore our stained sofa bed.

Jewel's facade is not all faded, though. Our favorite spot to grab breakfast and lunch on the go was O'Sheehan's Bar & Grill, which was added onboard Jewel during a spring 2014 dry dock. O'Sheehan's is bright and airy, thanks to windows on both sides, and it dishes up guilty pleasure pub grub like fish 'n' chips and chicken pot pies.

A pleasant side effect of O'Sheehan's, open 24/7, is that it takes pressure off the main dining rooms, making the waits for dinner, which in the past could be up to an hour, much shorter. We never waited more than five minutes for a table, regardless of whether we showed up at 6 p.m. or 7 p.m.

Also added during dry dock is nifty digital signage that not only lets passengers know what's going on onboard, but allows them to make dining reservations and buy shore excursions on the spot. See that Cagney's is filling up fast? No need to get up to the reservations desk. Just swipe your key card, and you're all set to go.

Dining

Free Dining

With the addition of O'Sheehan's Bar & Grill during Norwegian Jewel's last dry dock, the ship now offers four free dining areas. Aside from offering tasty, free food, O'Sheehan's also relieves some of the stress on the main dining rooms; we never had to wait longer than five minutes for a table in either Azura or Tsar's Palace because many people chose O'Sheehan's instead.

Norwegian Jewel also features Norwegian Cruise Line's new Norwegian NEXT dining program in its main dining rooms. The line created Norwegian NEXT to address the numerous complaints it received about the main dining room food. The menus in the two dining rooms are identical and quite extensive with 11 starters and 15 entrees to choose from, including seven "classic" entrees offered every night. Most of the entrees we tried were excellent, though you'll still find the occasional over-sauced dish. Our favorite main dining room meals were a delicious cod dish the first night and surprisingly tasty potato beignets (potato and spinach blintz-like creations over an okra-based ratatouille).

Azura Main Dining Room (Deck 6): The smaller of the two main dining rooms, Azura features a quirky pop art decor and can be rather noisy. Tables closer to the entrance also can be a bit chilly. Ask for a table off to the side if you get cold easily, or bring a sweater. As with both main dining rooms, you can ask to be seated with another party or dine on your own. Service in Azura is fast and friendly. Dinner is served from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Tsar's Palace Main Dining Room (Deck 6): According to Norwegian, the decor in Tsar's Palace is inspired by the "grandeur" of the palaces of St. Petersburg and the era of the Russian tsars. Larger and fancier than Azura, Tsar's Palace does have more of a banquet hall feel to it, with marbled pillars and faux Faberge egg balustrades, but it's quieter, and the service just a tad slower leading to a more leisurely meal. Tsar's also provides table service for breakfast (7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.), lunch (noon to 1:30 p.m.) and dinner (5 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.).

Garden Cafe (Deck 12): Norwegian's signature buffet, the Garden Cafe offers breakfast, lunch and dinner via several standalone stations. Breakfasts include prepared-to-order omelets, scrambled eggs, waffles, pancakes, cereal, pastries and fruit. Apple and orange juice, tea and coffee are available for free during breakfast. Lunches and dinners feature pastas, carving stations, sandwiches and other hot entrees. Additionally, most nights are themed and, on our sailing, they included seafood, country western, a salmon bake and a taste of Asia. At the front of the Garden Cafe, you'll find the Kid's Cafe, which offers a kid-friendly menu and kid-sized seating. During the lunch rush (and weather permitting), you can also find seating in the Great Outdoors extension of the Garden Cafe, which offers a more limited version of the foods offered inside. Another extension of the buffet is the outdoor Topsiders Grill (also on Deck 12), offering beef and turkey burgers, hot dogs and sausages, and grilled chicken with all the fixings. Norwegian Jewel's Garden Cafe also is home to the line's original Washy-Washy waiter, who sings his love-it-or-hate-it song to the tune of "London Bridge Is Falling Down" while spraying your hands with sanitizer. Ask him to sing his "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" version. It's brilliant.

O'Sheehan's Neighborhood Bar & Grill (Deck 8): Added during Norwegian Jewel's last dry dock, sports-themed O'Sheehan's is a 24-hour pub eatery first introduced on Norwegian Epic. The venue has proved so popular that it's being rolled out to the entire fleet. This iteration of O'Sheehan's, which overlooks the Crystal Atrium, is primarily a restaurant, though there is a small bar with two TVs showing sporting events. The menu features classic pub favorites like fish 'n' chips, chicken pot pie, old-fashioned meatloaf and fried mozzarella sticks. Lunch and dinner menus are the same, except dinner also highlights a rotating special of spare ribs, prime rib or fried chicken. My favorite place to grab breakfast, O'Sheehan's offers a traditional morning menu, including items like two eggs any style with sausage and bacon, homemade corned beef hash, made-to-order omelets and French toast.

Room Service: With so many dining venues, it's easy to forget that 24-hour room service is also available (except on the morning of debarkation). From 6:30 a.m. until 10 a.m., you can enjoy continental fare like juice, fresh fruit, muffins and cold cereal. Lunch and dinner options include perennial favorites like chicken Caesar salad and sandwiches, plus kid-pleasers like hot dogs and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Fee Dining

As with all Norwegian Cruise Line ships, Norwegian Jewel offers a variety of specialty restaurants that cover a wide spectrum of food styles. Prices range from $15 to $30 per person.

Le Bistro French Restaurant (Deck 6); $20 per person: A classic date night restaurant, Le Bistro offers upscale French dining and attentive service. Menu items run a bit on the heavy side and include dishes like cream of four mushroom soup, coq au vin, grilled beef tenderloin, duck breast and escargot. For an additional $10 per person, you can also select seafood puff pastry with lobster, shrimp and scallops; a butter roasted lobster tail; or a 32-ounce rib-eye steak for two.

Chin Chin Asian Restaurant (Deck 7); $15 per person and a la carte sushi: A pan-Asian eatery (Chinese, Japanese and Thai), Chin Chin offers a dinner menu that includes hot and sour soup, vegetarian spring rolls, lemon pepper shrimp, noodle dishes and fried rice. You also can order sushi and sashimi at a la carte prices, as well as a Szechuan stir-fried lobster tail entree for an additional $10 surcharge. There are also four tables with small built-in oven tops for a special type of Japanese meal called Shabu Shabu, where sliced beef is cooked in a noodle pot in front of diners. Food is a bit hit-or-miss, with some dishes being quite tasty and others a tad mediocre. On full or half sea days, the sushi and sashimi also are available for lunch at the small sushi bar.

Teppanyaki (Deck 7); $25 per person: One of Norwegian's most popular signature eateries (and rightfully so), this Benihana-esque hibachi restaurant serves up delicious Japanese fare prepared by a knife-wielding chef who does a variety of tricks on a large cooking top in front of diners. Entrees include combinations of chicken, beef and seafood (including lobster), served with miso soup, seafood salad, vegetables and garlic fried rice. Four chefs banging utensils in the small space can get loud, but most of the din is over within 10 to 15 minutes. Wear earplugs if you must; the food is too good to forego just because of the noise.

La Cucina (Deck 12); $15 per person: The weakest link in Norwegian Jewel's specialty restaurant lineup, La Cucina offers rather mediocre Italian food in a pleasant setting at the back of the ship. The menu consists of traditional favorites like fried calamari, bruschetta, chicken parmesan, osso buco, shrimp risotto, spaghetti and meatballs or spaghetti carbonara, Italian sausage, vegetarian lasagna and pizza.

Cagney's Steakhouse (Deck 13); $30 per person: Located in one corner of Deck 13, immediately across from the ship's Brazilian steakhouse, Cagney's is Norwegian's signature American steakhouse, serving filet mignon, T-bone steak, rib-eye and New York strip. Diners will also find salmon and pork chop options. Cagney's is very popular and fills up quickly. Make your reservation in advance if you want a prime-time dinner slot.

Moderno Churrascaria (Deck 13); $20 per person: You'll need to skip lunch if you've booked dinner at this Brazilian steakhouse. That's because the amount of skewered meats on offer can be a bit overwhelming, and they'll keep serving until you tell them to stop. There's also a sizeable salad bar if you want a little green to go along with all that meat.

Carlo's Bake Shop (Deck 7); a la carte: This tiny outpost of "Cake Boss" Buddy Valastro's famous bakery is located in the Crystal Atrium, right next to the Atrium Cafe and Bar. There you'll find cupcakes, lobster tails, cannolis and cakes baked fresh daily. You can even order a custom cake for special occasions. Prices range from 75 cents for an individual rugelach and $2.25 for a cupcake to $24.95 for a 7-inch cake.

Pizza 24/7 (Delivered); $5: As if the rest of the options onboard aren't enough, Norwegian Jewel also offers pizza delivery to almost anywhere on the ship, 24 hours a day. Pies are 16 inches, so you'll want to share.

Public Rooms

Cabins

Jewel has 1,188 cabins in five general categories, including 16 cabins in The Haven, Norwegian's ship-within-a-ship area. Families can choose from about 141 interconnecting cabins in a range of categories, from standard insides to suites. Different grades of cabins can be linked to create two- to five-bedroom areas for immediate families, extended families and family reunion groups. Jewel has 37 wheelchair-accessible cabins.

Generally, cabins are decorated in bold colors (think fuchsia, dark blue, maroon) with golden wood finishes and feature flat-screen TVs, coffeemakers, minibars and hair dryers. Each cabin comes with two lower beds that can be converted into a queen-sized bed; many also have Pullman beds, and some have rollaway cots. Most cabins feature one closet with enough room for the clothes of three, maybe four, adults; there's plenty of room to hang items, plus shelves. The closets and bathrooms in inside, oceanview and balcony cabins are identical, but outside cabins and above also offer at least three drawers.

Bathrooms are perfectly sized for one person at a time, with separate toilet and shower areas, and they have ample shelf space for toiletries. Combination shampoo/conditioner and body wash dispensers are available in all cabins, as is bar soap. Those staying in balcony cabins and above receive robes and slippers for use during their cruise. Passengers in minisuite cabins and above will find individual bottles of Elemis shampoo, conditioner and body lotion.

Interior: Inside cabins start at 143 square feet. Though a bit snug, they can accommodate two to three people.

Oceanview: At 161 square feet, oceanview cabins are roomier than inside cabins and feature picture or porthole windows.

Balcony: Balcony cabins offer slightly more space, starting at 205 square feet, and have small sitting areas. Balconies, which feature two chairs apiece, are comfortable for two adults, though three would not be too much of a squeeze.

Minisuites: Starting at 284 square feet, minisuites provide a lot more space -- and bigger balconies -- than standard balcony cabins. They come with larger bathrooms equipped with tubs. Comfortable sitting areas offer convertible sofas. Minisuites do not come with any suite-level services.

Suites: Even larger are the 20 Penthouse Suites, which can be up to 572 square feet. These cabins each feature a separate bedroom with queen-sized bed and flat-screen TV with CD/DVD player and library, separate living and dining areas, a bathroom with either a separate or combination shower and tub, a larger sized balcony and a walk-in closet. Penthouse suites come with butler and concierge services.

Similar to the penthouse suites are 10 two-bedroom, 546-square-foot family suites, which sleep up to six passengers in two bedrooms.

Passengers who seek privacy should think about booking The Haven, which requires a key card for exclusive access and features 24-hour butler service, concierge service and access to a private courtyard area with pool, hot tub and small gym. Haven cabins come with flat-screen TVs with CD/DVD players and espresso/cappuccino coffeemakers.

The two Haven Courtyard Penthouses, up to 440 square feet, each feature a bedroom with queen-sized bed, an oversized bath and shower, a living area with an entertainment system, a dining room and a large balcony. A bit larger is the Haven two-bedroom family villa, 572 square feet, which has two bedrooms (one with a queen-sized bed), separate living and dining spaces, an oversized bath and a separate shower.

Norwegian Jewel's largest accommodations are the two 4,891-square-foot Haven Garden Villas and four 823-square-foot Haven Owner's Suites. The Garden Villas are multiroom suites, each with panoramic ocean views, oversized balcony with whirlpool, steam room, private sunning area and outdoor dining space, living room with piano, entertainment system, bar and three bedrooms with king- or queen-sized beds and a private bathroom. The Owner's Suites are two-room suites and include two balconies apiece, a private bedroom with king-sized bed and walk-in closet, full bath with separate shower and powder room, and a living room with dining space and an entertainment system.

Other than Penthouse suites, no cabins have been refurbished in several years, though mattresses are being replaced deck by deck. Upholstery in many of the cabins looks dated, faded and, in some cases, stained.

Entertainment

There's rarely a quiet moment on Norwegian Jewel; live music is always playing somewhere, and the entertainment staff's constantly got something going on. Daytime fun runs the gamut from trivia and art auctions to games of Bingo and "Deal or No Deal." Once the sun goes down, the ship is all about live music, laughter, karaoke and dancing.

Theater

Every night, the ship's three-deck art nouveau Stardust Theater (decks 5 through 7) plays host to a show, with a wide range of performance styles on offer each cruise. We were entranced by the captivating beauty and raw strength of a Russian aerialist duo, the best act of the cruise. The rest of the performances were a bit "take it or leave it," with a comedian, magician/comedian and two cruise revue shows rounding out the entertainment. The second show, Le Cirque Bijou, attempts to add elements of Cirque du Soleil to what is essentially a traditional cruise Vegas-style revue. When acrobatics are involved, it's engaging, but the song-and-dance numbers fall flat. The Stardust Theater also is used for "Deal or No Deal" and daytime movies.

Daily Fun

A quick glance at the Freestyle Daily tells you all you need to know about daytime fun -- there's a lot of it. Trivia sessions are offered twice a day at various bars and lounges, as are demonstrations ranging from cooking and vegetable carving to towel animal making. Dance and fitness classes (free and for fee) are on offer, as are myriad family fun activities, from a circus workshop and cupcake decorating class to family dodgeball and Nickelodeon arts and crafts. In the main theater, you'll find a movie playing every day; on our Alaska cruise, the theater was used for educational videos about Alaska on our first full day. Shuffleboard, sports competitions, art auctions, drink tastings, goofy golf challenges, bingo, "Deal or No Deal" and casino tournaments are other daytime options.

Keep in mind that almost all of the so-called seminars like detoxing for health and weight loss, digital cameras or relieving back pain are money-making pitches to get you buy things.

At Night

Norwegian Jewel comes alive at night with music and dancing. Bar City and the Crystal Atrium offer live music, including jazz, piano and covers of popular music, while the two lounges also feature music but add space for dancing. A typical night's rundown includes such events as salsa dance classes with the Jewel cast, rock night with the Next Stage band in the Fyzz lounge, piano and vocals in Magnum's, the Karaoke blast, and late night with DJ Watson in Spinnaker.

Not interested in music? Game time doesn't stop at night, with such popular cruise games as Battle of the Sexes, the Not So Newlywed Game and movie-themed trivia.

Jewel Club Casino is on Deck 7 forward and features slot machines and a variety of table games that include poker, roulette and craps. Depending on the itinerary, the casino might run slot and poker tournaments.

Norwegian Jewel Bars and Lounges

Along with the more sedate Crystal Atrium, Bar City on Deck 6 is the main place to hang out with a drink on Norwegian Jewel, though you'll find a couple of poolside and sun deck bars, too. The three bars that comprise Bar City are strung together seamlessly with the majority of seating at either end and just a little seating across from the middle bar (Shakers). Just the signage, a subtle shift in wood color and a few bar-specific decorations indicate you're actually passing three distinct bars. A small Cigar Bar is located in this area, as well.

Magnum's Champagne and Wine Bar (Deck 6): The first of the three bars that make up Bar City, Magnum's is the Champagne bar -- as denoted by the colored bubbling liquids inside the glass bar counter. Magnum's has the most seating in Bar City and no TVs. Instead, it's a great place to chill in the evening and listen to live music.

Shakers Martini and Cocktail Bar (Deck 6): Right next door is Shakers, marked on either side by statues of Sean Connery and Ursula Andress from the bond movie "Dr. No." Limited seating means Shakers is mainly a place to grab your drink, though you will find the main sporting event of the day on the TV there.

Maltings Beer and Whisky Bar (Deck 6): The big copper still in front of Bar City's third bar lets you know this is where the brewed and distilled drinks are served. Maltings is also where you'll find the ship's weekly beer and whisky tastings, the most number of TVs playing sporting events and the best place to sit with friends to talk. It's not a spot for music, though you can hear the sounds of the piano or jazz band playing in nearby Magnum's.

Atrium Cafe & Bar (Deck 7): Located in the Crystal Atrium, the Cafe & Bar is primarily a coffee bar. There is a tiny bar counter -- just five scooped purple bar stools -- and selections are limited to specialty coffees, teas and pastries, including baked goods from Carlo's Bakery, as well as select beers, wines and cocktails. At night, one or another of the ship's bands plays popular hits from the '40s through today.

FYZZ Cabaret Lounge & Bar (Deck 7): Norwegian Jewel's karaoke lounge is awash in mood lighting, a bubble-themed carpet and blue and purple bubbly chairs. If you love karaoke, this is the one lounge you must frequent. For small groups that want private karaoke sessions, there are three color-coded rooms. For all others, nightly karaoke sessions draw quite a crowd when the singers are good (or especially bad). Late-night dancing also is on offer in FYZZ, as are parties for solo travelers and the occasional sing-along (think The Beatles or classic rock).

Sake Bar (Deck 7): You'll find the rarely occupied Sake Bar immediately outside of Chin Chin restaurant, next to the sushi bar. Choose from a selection of sakes from 5:30 p.m. 'til late.

O'Sheehan's (Deck 8): The bar part of O'Sheehan's Bar & Grill is pretty small. There are only a few barstools, with two TVs playing sporting events, but it does have the largest beer selection (both domestic and imported) on the ship. Unlike other iterations of O'Sheehan's, there are no bar games (darts, billiards, etc.) to enjoy.

Topsiders Bar (Deck 12): The ship's poolside bar offers limited bar seating and a small selection of beers and cocktails.

Sugarcane Mojito Bar (Deck 13): The Sugarcane Mojito Bar debuted on Norwegian Getaway and was popular enough for the line to schedule a fleetwide rollout. Located at the front of Moderno Churrascaria, the Sugarcane is unassuming and easy to walk past. But, from 5 p.m. on, it's the place to be if you like mojitos. Though the bar's hours include an early afternoon shift (noon to 2 p.m.), we never saw anyone there during the day.

Sky High Bar (Deck 13): Located one deck above the pool, you'll find more seating there and a slightly wider selection of drinks than at the pool bar. Rarely crowded, Sky High Bar is a good place to chill outside in the shade.

Spinnaker Lounge (Deck 13): For most of your dance-related nighttime entertainment, you'll need to head to Deck 13 and Spinnaker Lounge. There you'll find the ship's largest dance floor, home to everything from country and western line dances to ballroom dancing and pulse-pounding dance music. But Spinnaker also is home to cabaret performances by the ship's singers, "Dancing with the Jewel Stars" and interactive game shows like the Liar's Club. During the ship's most recent dry dock, the dance floor was replaced, but the bright red upholstery was not; don't be surprised to find faded, stained seating throughout the lounge.

Norwegian Jewel Outside Recreation

Pools
Norwegian Jewel has four hot tubs and two regular pools, one with a tubed waterslide, all on Deck 12. All are outside and have an accessible electrical hoist for passengers who need assistance. The poolside deck has room for more than 300 deck chairs. The Haven courtyard, on Deck 14, features an indoor pool and hot tub that's only for suite passengers.

Recreation
Norwegian Jewel has a small sports deck on Deck 13, where there's a basketball court. A volleyball or tennis net can be strung up there, and soccer goals are erected for shootouts. Two golf driving nets are located on Deck 13, as well, as is an oversized chess set. There's also a jogging/walking track around Deck 13; one mile is 5.5 laps.

Sun Decks
Sun worshippers will find space on Deck 12 by the pool, as well as on decks 14 and 15. Haven suite passengers have their own private sun deck space on Deck 15.

Norwegian Jewel Services

The Crystal Atrium on Deck 7 is where the main passenger service desks are, including shore excursions and guest services. Those who want to book their next cruise can do so in the same area at the Future Cruise Sales desk.

Also on this deck are the art gallery, photo shop, Internet cafe and onboard stores. The photo shop was recently digitized, so passengers can now review all their pictures on computer monitors; print copies are kept in binders along the wall, as well. The Galleria Shops, aft, feature essentials like toiletries and snacks, as well as logo apparel, jewelry (costume and gemstone), alcohol and tobacco.

A small Internet Cafe is located immediately next to the art gallery and has eight computer stations. Wi-Fi is available shipwide. Passengers can purchase Internet minutes via the pay-as-you-go option at 75 cents per minute or buy a package: 100 minutes for $55 or 250 minutes for $100. Plans purchased on embarkation day receive up to 20 free minutes as a bonus. There is a $3.95 activation fee for all plans. As with all Internet at sea, speed is slower than you would get on land, especially during peak times and sea days.

The ship's library on Deck 12 offers a selection of fiction and nonfiction books, primarily in English. All items are free for passengers to borrow on a trust system. You'll also find daily trivia, crossword and Sudoku printouts in the library. Next door is the card room where passengers go to play bridge and other card games.

Norwegian Jewel also has a bridge viewing room on Deck 11 and a small chapel on Deck 13.

Fitness and Recreation

Spa

The Mandara Spa is located on Deck 12 at the front of the ship. The simply decorated space offers traditional cruise-ship treatments, including a variety of massages, facials, wraps and scrubs, as well as teeth whitening, acupuncture and Botox. Spa specials are offered throughout the cruise, usually on days when the ship is in port.

While there is a relaxation area with heated loungers in the Thermal Suite, it is only available to those who pay the weekly fee of $149 (no day passes) and is not offered to passengers receiving spa services. Also in the Thermal Suite are separate men and women's saunas, steam rooms and thermal plunge baths. Passes are limited to 100 per cruise.

Adjacent to the spa is a beauty salon, where passengers can get manicures, pedicures, hair color treatments and styling. An 18 percent gratuity is automatically added to all spa and salon services.

Fitness

The fitness center onboard (also on Deck 12) has a variety of cardio and strength-training equipment with ellipticals and treadmills facing the ocean. Try to go during off hours (super early or late), as it can get busy during peak times, especially on sea days. A variety of classes (both free and for a fee) are offered.

Runners and walkers can use the ship's outer promenade on Deck 7 or the jogging track on Deck 13.

Family

Norwegian Jewel, like all of the Norwegian fleet, is built with families in mind. It offers amenities like interconnecting cabins, children's menus in the main dining rooms, a kids-only pool with a waterslide (though we saw adults in there) and two free kids clubs. Activities designed for the entire family to enjoy together are offered throughout the day.

Norwegian's Splashdown Academy Youth Center, located on Deck 12, is divided into four age groups: Guppies (6 months to 2 years, with a parent present), Turtles (ages 3 to 5), Seals (ages 6 to 9) and Dolphins (ages 10 to 12). Splashdown features an indoor play gym, a movie theater showing kids movies, a computer center with child-appropriate games, and an arts and crafts area.

The teen program, called Entourage Teen's Club, is for 13- to 17-year olds. Inside the club are a juice bar, gaming consoles and Club Underground, a New York subway-themed disco. Activities include gaming tournaments, disco nights, socials and movies.

Parents should be aware that the kids clubs are only free on sea days. On port days, there's a charge of $6 per child, per supervised meal provided. Depending on when the ship arrives into port, meals may include a combination of breakfast, lunch or dinner. On port days, children ages 3 to 12 are combined into one group for arrival into port or until departure or 6 p.m. (whichever comes first). Also, late-night baby-sitting (10:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.) is a fee-based group drop-off service for children ages 3 to 12. The fee is $6 per child, per hour, and $4 per additional sibling, per hour.

Fellow Passengers

In the Caribbean, the majority of passengers are North American, though you'll find lots of Brits looking to escape the winter cold, as well. In Alaska, you'll find a bit more of an international mix with passengers from Australia, Europe and Asia also onboard. The ship draws a broad range of age groups, especially during summer and winter/spring breaks when children and teens are out of school.

Dress Code

Casual dress is the name of the game when it comes to Norwegian's freestyle cruising. You might spot a handful of passengers in suits or cocktail dresses on the ship's one (very optional) formal night, but most stick to a fairly laid-back version of formal (i.e. slacks, collared shirts, sundresses, skirts, etc.). This is especially true while the ship is in Alaska. Shorts are allowed in all dining venues except the Tsar's Palace main dining room and Le Bistro French restaurant. After 5 p.m., tank tops, flip-flops and baseball caps are not permitted in any of the restaurants.

Gratuity

Passengers are billed $12 per person, per day, and can prepay the charge or pay while onboard. Passengers can also tip individually with cash or by filling out vouchers at the guest services desk if they prefer. Crewmembers are permitted to keep all cash tips they receive. A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to bar drinks, while 18 percent is added to spa services. For passengers using butler and concierge services, Norwegian recommends a tip "commensurate with the services rendered."

Cruise Critic

Cruise reviews are provided by CruiseCritic.com, an award-winning cruise community and online resource for objective cruise information, published by The Independent Traveler. Copyright 1995-2009, The Independent Traveler, Inc. All rights reserved. Travelocity.com LP neither assumes any liability nor makes any representations with respect to cruise reviews and other content provided by CruiseCritic.com. Before relying on any information in a cruise review, we recommend that passengers confirm the information with the cruise line.


2. Now consider these offers:

Exclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailing
Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!
Pay No Service Fees
No Booking Fees! Book online or call a Cruise Expert at 1.877.815.5446!

3. And now select your cruise dates:**


Apr-May-Jun 2015 Cruise Offers*** Inside Oceanview Balcony Suite
May 16 - 23, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$1,049
$1,279
$2,069
$2,199
May 23 - 30, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$969
$1,349
$1,819
$2,119
May 30 - Jun 6, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$949
$1,299
$1,819
$2,129
Jun 6 - 13, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$999
$1,299
$1,829
$2,149
Jun 13 - 20, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$999
$1,319
$1,879
$2,129
Jun 20 - 27, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$1,189
$1,549
$2,069
$2,629
Jun 27 - Jul 4, 2015 Special Star - Specialty Dining Package available for purchase!Special Star - Ultimate Beverage Package (Ages 21+) available for purchase.  Save $5 when purchasing prior to sailingExclamation - Black Friday DASHSALE from NORWEGIAN!  Reduced Deposit plus Up to $250 OnBoard Credit* per stateroom
$1,159
$1,399
$2,029
$2,479

For planning or booking assistance, please call a Travelocity Cruise Expert at 877-815-5446.


Cruise Details

Included: Shipboard Accommodations, Meals, Some Beverages, Onboard Entertainment and Daily Activities, Port Charges, 24-Hour Room Service

Not Included: Shore Excursions, Personal Expenses, Gratuities, Alcoholic Beverages, Specialty Restaurants, Spa Treatments, Some Taxes

Optional Add-Ons: Flights, Hotels, Transfers, Insurance


N/A: This stateroom type does not exist on this ship.

*All itineraries are subject to change without notice.

**Prices are per person/double occupancy. Additional Taxes and Fees - opens in a new window will apply.

***Some Cruise Offers are dependent on the type of stateroom purchased.

Need Help?

Call a Travelocity Cruise Expert at
877-815-5446
For help on planning and booking your cruise.

Cruise ID:

73155