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Cruise Ship Review

Celebrity Eclipse - Ship Review provided by Cruise Critic

Sneak Preview

First Impressions

Passengers who have been on either of the first two ships in Celebrity's Solstice class (Celebrity Solstice and Celebrity Equinox) will find themselves on familiar turf aboard Celebrity Eclipse. From our perspective, it's a case of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it," and understandably so, as we feel Celebrity did just about everything right on Solstice, the prototype of the class.

There are, of course, differences, but only two of them are significant: a highly original new alternative dining venue called Qsine (inexplicably pronounced "cuisine") and the replacement of the Internet cafe with Celebrity iLounge, a multipurpose room operated in partnership with Apple to provide enrichment, Internet service and retail sales.

Numerous minor tweaks and refinements also set Eclipse apart from its siblings. Besides differences in color palette and hanging art, the most noticeable changes are as follows:

The entrance area to the AquaSpa has been redesigned, separating the spa reception area from the entrance to the fitness facility. The previous design, which forced passengers seeking the gym to pass through the spa reception area, was confusing.

Another change in the spa/fitness area was the installation of shock absorbers under the gym's floor, which addressed the complaints of noise from passengers in AquaSpa Class staterooms directly below.

The small pass-through vestibule at the forward end of the Ensemble Lounge -- the popular home to interesting, cutting-edge art -- has been repeated at the aft end of the lounge. On Eclipse, the art installation is by prominent New York and South Florida artist, Daniel Arsham.

Though the "Team Earth" interactive and educational installation will continue on Celebrity Eclipse, the partner has been switched from National Geographic to the Smithsonian.

In deference to an anticipated increase in the number of British passengers (Eclipse will homeport in Southampton during the summer months), Celebrity will be adding appropriate choices to both food and bar menus and will be including an electric teapot in each stateroom.

Mealtime

Moonlight Sonata Restaurant is the main dining room, occupying Decks 3 and 4 at the aft end of the ship. Structurally, it is a carbon copy of the main dining rooms of the previous two Solstice-class ships, though the color palette is slightly altered. The dramatic, two-story glass wine tower, a visible structure that takes the place of a conventional wine cellar, is back as a visual accent to the room. Passengers have the option of choosing either conventional set-seating or more flexible open seating for dinner. Breakfast and lunch are served with open seating.

The Oceanview Cafe on Deck 14 is the Lido Deck buffet and casual dinner restaurant. Celebrity is continuing its highly successful "island" design with this venue. Instead of buffet lines and a linear layout of food offerings, individual serving islands -- many with chefs or servers present -- are spread around the spacious room, allowing plenty of space for passengers to gather around the station serving their choice of dish. Station assignments are flexible: the station serving cheese and sliced meats at breakfast may turn into a salad bar at lunch; the pancake and waffle station may similarly be reincarnated as Asian stir-fry. Trays have been eliminated from the equation. Passengers can either bring their food to the table one plate at a time or call upon the omnipresent waiters to assist.

Other casual options include an outdoor grill (burgers, hot dogs, etc.) on the same deck as the Oceanview Cafe and, for light and healthy spa fare, the AquaSpa Cafe, which is open for breakfast and lunch by the spa pool.

For alternative dining choices, Deck 5 is ground zero. Surrounding the midship atrium are, on one side, Cafe al Bacio & Gelateria and, on the other side, the immensely popular Bistro on Five, which serves crepes, panini and salads at a cover charge of $5. The Bistro opens at 8 a.m. and remains open until just after midnight. It's a hot spot for lunch, but a number of the crepe choices are breakfast crepes, which makes it an underused, uncrowded nook for breakfast, hidden away from the hustle and bustle of the Oceanview Cafe. Cafe al Bacio serves a menu of coffees and pastries, while Gelateria is the spot for, well, gelato.

Moving aft from this cluster of dining and snacking options, you'll find another cluster, this time a grouping of Eclipse's upscale, sophisticated alternative restaurants. Three of them -- Qsine, Blu and Tuscan Grille -- are quartered around the very back end of the ship, offering expansive views aft through picture windows. Murano, the French/continental top-of-the-line venue has its windows facing sideways, rather than aft. At $35 per person, Murano is the priciest of the group, and there are plenty of ways to ratchet the price even higher, should you choose to add on surcharges for caviar or paired wines. Tuscan Grille, essentially an Italian-themed steakhouse, is priced at $30 per person. Blu is a private dining room that's reserved for passengers booked in AquaSpa cabins, and Qsine is Celebrity's newest restaurant concept, which replaces Silk Harvest, the Asian fusion eatery on the first two Solstice ships (more about Qsine later).

Bedtime

If you win the lottery and want to book a cruise, go for one of Eclipse's two 1,291-square-foot Penthouse suites. When you're not reclining on your balcony -- which, at 389 square feet, is twice the size of a Deluxe Ocean View stateroom -- you can rattle about your separate living room/dining room, complete with full bar, two 52-inch flat-screen TV's and baby grand piano (pianist not included). To make sure you don't miss a single moment of the shore talk video presentation on your interactive television, there's a 26-inch LCD TV in the bathroom.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, inside cabins (accounting for 10 percent of inventory) measure from 183 to 200 square feet. Of the 90 percent of accommodations that have ocean views, nearly all have verandahs -- only 70 outside staterooms do not. Our Deluxe Ocean View stateroom, which included a 53-square-foot verandah, felt a lot roomier than its 192 square feet. Like all accommodations aboard Eclipse, it had an exceptionally spacious bathroom, which allowed for an unusually commodious amount of storage space and room for a large shower stall with a curved, acrylic sliding door. The major reason for this spaciousness is a technological breakthrough achieved by Celebrity and the Meyer Werft shipyard, which rearranged the plumbing inside the walls bordering the hallway to reduce their width by about half and put the extra space back into the baths' interiors.

Cabin color schemes make use of a bright palette, but it's not so bold as to be jarring. The decor is softened further with the use of light-tinted leather upholstery for chairs and sofas. Standard cabin amenities include safes, refrigerators/mini-bars, bathrobes, interactive flat-screen TV's, Wi-Fi (also available, stem-to-stern, in public rooms) and Elemis bath products.

In addition to the two Penthouse Suites, 64 other levels of suites range from 300 to 590 square feet and include verandas. The 130 AquaClass staterooms have shells identical to Deluxe Ocean View cabins, differing only in the inclusion of extra privileges and amenities. These include an augmented selection of spa-oriented cosmetics, gels and bath products; upgraded linens, including a selection from the "pillow menu"; Frette robes and slippers; complimentary healthy beverages and snacks delivered daily; access to an exclusive room service menu of salads, whole grains and healthy dining choices; and priority access to Blu, the specialty restaurant exclusive to AquaClass residents. The bathroom features a five-head Hansgrohe invigorating "shower tower."

Four Family Ocean View staterooms measure 575 square feet with ample verandas, and 30 cabins are wheelchair accessible.

Grand Old Favorites

The two most iconic attributes of the Solstice class, the Lawn Club and Hot Glass Show, are most definitely back. So central -- and popular -- are these two features that one might almost think Celebrity would leave off the ship's propellers before eliminating these two favorites. (However, prospective passengers dreaming of running their toes through the Lawn Club's half-acre of real grass on a Southampton departure during the early part of Eclipse's inaugural season may want to confirm the area's status. As of mid-March 2010, the grass had yet to be planted, and the weather is still likely to be less than summery in the U.K. when it's expected to take root.)

The Hot Glass Show -- the glass-art studio, adjacent to the Lawn Club and operated by the Corning Glass Museum -- will continue to wow passengers with demonstrations of the glassblowing art. One new fillip here is a retail glass shop directly across the lawn from the Lawn Club Shop.

Other crowd-pleasers returning on Eclipse include the Martini Bar and Crush, the Ensemble Lounge and the comfy Michael's Club. The Entertainment Court on Deck 4 continues to function as a secondary atrium, gathering place and open entertainment area. The glass balcony and curved stairway rimming it from the deck above have been enlarged and expanded to allow more room for passengers to take in the entertainment from above.

New & Nifty

Celebrity iLounge is the first shipboard computer enrichment and Internet hub to be sanctioned by Apple. The space occupies the same Deck 6 area as the Internet cafe on the previous two Solstice-class ships, and though it will still provide the primary function of enabling passengers to access the Internet, it will offer much more. Twenty-six workstations are arranged to face a 56-inch flat-screen teaching monitor, where Apple-trained Celebrity techs will teach classes in producing photo books (iPhoto), editing videos (iMovie) and developing Web sites (iWeb). Apple will also provide the software and hardware for the workstations, as well as merchandise for a mini-store selling iPods, MacBooks and accessories. Techs will be available to assist passengers with hardware and software issues, including help accessing social media sites onboard. Windows workstations will also be available.

Arguably, the most dramatic new addition to Eclipse is the groundbreaking alternative restaurant, Qsine. It's the brainchild of Jacques Van Staden, Celebrity's Vice President of Culinary Operations. While most shipboard specialty restaurants fall into fairly well-defined genres -- French, Italian, Steaks & Seafood, Asian and the like -- Qsine takes commonplace or comfort foods and twists the recipe, presentation or both to live up to its slogan, "Uniquely Unordinary."

Order meatballs at Qsine, for example, and rather than the standard ground beef with tomato sauce, you get a trio: Kobe beef with cheddar and marinara, veal with mushrooms and marsala, and turkey meatballs with cranberry and sage gravy. Menu item "Popcorn Fish" is bite-sized battered and fried codfish served in a movie-theater popcorn box, while spring rolls come to the table impaled on bouncy metal springs. If you order guacamole, be prepared to work for your appetizer: it's a do-it-yourself affair, with avocado chunks brought to the table in a stone mortar and pestle. Sushi is formed into lollipops with soy/rice centers. In fact, there is only one dish on the entire menu that is served on a conventional plate!

Both the food and the ambience at Qsine are meant to be fun, a signal you get when you first walk into the room and see the overhead lighting: table lamps with ornate shades mounted upside down on the ceiling! Cover charge at Qsine is $30 per person.

Kid-Friendly Factor

Like Eclipse's restaurants and shops, kids' facilities are clustered, as well. Arranged around the forward mast are the basketball court, video arcade, Shipmates room (the play area for kids, ages 3 through 5), Fun Factory (for ages 6 through 11) and X-Club (a hangout for the 12 to 17 set). Whether it was by design or coincidence, the placement of this youth cluster is at the extreme opposite end of Deck 15 from the Lawn Club and Hot Glass Show, with a gulf of empty space extending down to the Lido Deck in between.

Organized activities are extensive, broken into five age-specific groups: Shipmates (3 - 5), Cadets (6 - 8), Ensigns (9 - 11), Tweens (12 - 14) and Teens (15 - 17).

On the accommodations side, Celebrity Eclipse offers a total of 418 cabins that will accommodate three or four persons, including the four Family Ocean View staterooms, and 121 cabins have connecting doors.

Huh?

Though it may seem bizarre, our choice for the "What Were They Thinking?" award is the same choice as one of our selections for "Nifty & New." How is this possible? It's like an actor getting a Best Actor Oscar and a Razzie (Worst Actor) Award for the same role in the same picture. Yet, it's true. We found that Qsine, while earning kudos for its trendy, cook-outside-the-box cuisine, fell flat on its face with certain choices where it appeared the chefs opted for cuteness and quirkiness at the expense of quality or functionality.

"Qsine Two examples:

While we get the fun concept of serving food in almost anything but conventional tableware, Qsine's "Crunchy Munchies" dish, a selection of deep-fried finger foods, is served in a narrow, pyramidal cardboard container, which won't stand up on its own and cannot be set down on the table without spilling the contents onto the tabletop.

The physical menu also needs a makeover. Instead of using a conventional paper menu, Chef Van Staden has decided to print Qsine's menu on a transparent glass panel, measuring about 6.5 inches square (pictured to the right: click image to view a larger version.) That panel sits in a tabletop housing with a switch that turns on a light, illuminating the menu from behind. Cute idea, but putting all the menu choices in such a small area reduces the menu to a confusing boilerplate.

Bottom Line

Celebrity nearly hit it out of the park with Solstice, the prototype for the current class, and Eclipse carries on the winning tradition. Like its two predecessors, its main strength lies in blending seemingly opposite qualities into a unified whole: it's a large ship, but it's still intimate; it carries a large passenger load but seldom feels crowded; and, most of all, it manages to be high-energy and high-class at the same time.

The problem for Celebrity is going to come when the last of the five Solstice-class ships has floated out, and that problem will be how to top them.

These ships will be a tough act to follow.

--by Steve Faber, Cruise Critic contributor

Sneak Preview

First Impressions

Passengers who have been on either of the first two ships in Celebrity's Solstice class (Celebrity Solstice and Celebrity Equinox) will find themselves on familiar turf aboard Celebrity Eclipse. From our perspective, it's a case of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it," and understandably so, as we feel Celebrity did just about everything right on Solstice, the prototype of the class.

There are, of course, differences, but only two of them are significant: a highly original new alternative dining venue called Qsine (inexplicably pronounced "cuisine") and the replacement of the Internet cafe with Celebrity iLounge, a multipurpose room operated in partnership with Apple to provide enrichment, Internet service and retail sales.

Numerous minor tweaks and refinements also set Eclipse apart from its siblings. Besides differences in color palette and hanging art, the most noticeable changes are as follows:

The entrance area to the AquaSpa has been redesigned, separating the spa reception area from the entrance to the fitness facility. The previous design, which forced passengers seeking the gym to pass through the spa reception area, was confusing.

Another change in the spa/fitness area was the installation of shock absorbers under the gym's floor, which addressed the complaints of noise from passengers in AquaSpa Class staterooms directly below.

The small pass-through vestibule at the forward end of the Ensemble Lounge -- the popular home to interesting, cutting-edge art -- has been repeated at the aft end of the lounge. On Eclipse, the art installation is by prominent New York and South Florida artist, Daniel Arsham.

Though the "Team Earth" interactive and educational installation will continue on Celebrity Eclipse, the partner has been switched from National Geographic to the Smithsonian.

In deference to an anticipated increase in the number of British passengers (Eclipse will homeport in Southampton during the summer months), Celebrity will be adding appropriate choices to both food and bar menus and will be including an electric teapot in each stateroom.

Mealtime

Moonlight Sonata Restaurant is the main dining room, occupying Decks 3 and 4 at the aft end of the ship. Structurally, it is a carbon copy of the main dining rooms of the previous two Solstice-class ships, though the color palette is slightly altered. The dramatic, two-story glass wine tower, a visible structure that takes the place of a conventional wine cellar, is back as a visual accent to the room. Passengers have the option of choosing either conventional set-seating or more flexible open seating for dinner. Breakfast and lunch are served with open seating.

The Oceanview Cafe on Deck 14 is the Lido Deck buffet and casual dinner restaurant. Celebrity is continuing its highly successful "island" design with this venue. Instead of buffet lines and a linear layout of food offerings, individual serving islands -- many with chefs or servers present -- are spread around the spacious room, allowing plenty of space for passengers to gather around the station serving their choice of dish. Station assignments are flexible: the station serving cheese and sliced meats at breakfast may turn into a salad bar at lunch; the pancake and waffle station may similarly be reincarnated as Asian stir-fry. Trays have been eliminated from the equation. Passengers can either bring their food to the table one plate at a time or call upon the omnipresent waiters to assist.

Other casual options include an outdoor grill (burgers, hot dogs, etc.) on the same deck as the Oceanview Cafe and, for light and healthy spa fare, the AquaSpa Cafe, which is open for breakfast and lunch by the spa pool.

For alternative dining choices, Deck 5 is the hub. Surrounding the midship atrium are, on one side, Cafe al Bacio & Gelateria and, on the other side, the immensely popular Bistro on Five, which serves crepes, panini and salads at a cover charge of $5. The Bistro opens at 8 a.m. and remains open until just after midnight. It's a hot spot for lunch, but a number of the crepe choices are breakfast crepes, which makes it an underused, uncrowded nook for breakfast, hidden away from the hustle and bustle of the Oceanview Cafe. Cafe al Bacio serves a menu of coffees and pastries, while Gelateria is the spot for, well, gelato.

Moving aft from this cluster of dining and snacking options, you'll find another cluster, this time a grouping of Eclipse's upscale, sophisticated alternative restaurants. Three of them -- Qsine, Blu and Tuscan Grille -- are quartered around the very back end of the ship, offering expansive views aft through picture windows. Murano, the French/continental top-of-the-line venue has its windows facing sideways, rather than aft. At $40 per person, Murano is tied for the priciest of the group, and there are plenty of ways to ratchet the price even higher, should you choose to add on surcharges for caviar or paired wines. Tuscan Grille, essentially an Italian-themed steakhouse, is priced at $30 per person. Blu is a private dining room that's reserved for passengers booked in AquaSpa cabins, and Qsine ($40) is Celebrity's funky concept restaurant, which replaces Silk Harvest, the Asian fusion eatery on the first two Solstice ships (more about Qsine later).

Bedtime

If you win the lottery and want to book a cruise, go for one of Eclipse's two 1,291-square-foot Penthouse suites. When you're not reclining on your balcony -- which, at 389 square feet, is twice the size of a Deluxe Ocean View stateroom -- you can rattle about your separate living room/dining room, complete with full bar, two 52-inch flat-screen TV's and baby grand piano (pianist not included). To make sure you don't miss a single moment of the shore talk video presentation on your interactive television, there's a 26-inch LCD TV in the bathroom.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, inside cabins (accounting for 10 percent of inventory) measure from 183 to 200 square feet. Of the 90 percent of accommodations that have ocean views, nearly all have verandahs -- only 70 outside staterooms do not. Our Deluxe Ocean View stateroom, which included a 53-square-foot verandah, felt a lot roomier than its 192 square feet. Like all accommodations aboard Eclipse, it had an exceptionally spacious bathroom, which allowed for an unusually commodious amount of storage space and room for a large shower stall with a curved, acrylic sliding door. The major reason for this spaciousness is a technological breakthrough achieved by Celebrity and the Meyer Werft shipyard, which rearranged the plumbing inside the walls bordering the hallway to reduce their width by about half and put the extra space back into the baths' interiors.

Cabin color schemes make use of a bright palette, but it's not so bold as to be jarring. The decor is softened further with the use of light-tinted leather upholstery for chairs and sofas. Standard cabin amenities include safes, refrigerators/mini-bars, bathrobes, interactive flat-screen TV's, Wi-Fi (also available, stem-to-stern, in public rooms) and Elemis bath products.

In addition to the two Penthouse Suites, 64 other levels of suites range from 300 to 590 square feet and include verandas. The 130 AquaClass staterooms have shells identical to Deluxe Ocean View cabins, differing only in the inclusion of extra privileges and amenities. These include an augmented selection of spa-oriented cosmetics, gels and bath products; upgraded linens, including a selection from the "pillow menu"; Frette robes and slippers; complimentary healthy beverages and snacks delivered daily; access to an exclusive room service menu of salads, whole grains and healthy dining choices; and priority access to Blu, the specialty restaurant exclusive to AquaClass residents. The bathroom features a five-head Hansgrohe invigorating "shower tower."

Four Family Ocean View staterooms measure 575 square feet with ample verandas, and 30 cabins are wheelchair accessible.

Grand Old Favorites

The two most iconic attributes of the Solstice class, the Lawn Club and Hot Glass Show, are most definitely back. So central -- and popular -- are these two features that one might almost think Celebrity would leave off the ship's propellers before eliminating these two favorites. (However, prospective passengers dreaming of running their toes through the Lawn Club's half-acre of real grass on a Southampton departure during the early part of Eclipse's inaugural season may want to confirm the area's status. As of mid-March 2010, the grass had yet to be planted, and the weather is still likely to be less than summery in the U.K. when it's expected to take root.)

The Hot Glass Show -- the glass-art studio, adjacent to the Lawn Club and operated by the Corning Glass Museum -- will continue to wow passengers with demonstrations of the glassblowing art. One new fillip here is a retail glass shop directly across the lawn from the Lawn Club Shop.

Other crowd-pleasers returning on Eclipse include the Martini Bar and Crush, the Ensemble Lounge and the comfy Michael's Club. The Entertainment Court on Deck 4 continues to function as a secondary atrium, gathering place and open entertainment area. The glass balcony and curved stairway rimming it from the deck above have been enlarged and expanded to allow more room for passengers to take in the entertainment from above.

New & Nifty

Celebrity iLounge is the first shipboard computer enrichment and Internet hub to be sanctioned by Apple. The space occupies the same Deck 6 area as the Internet cafe on the previous two Solstice-class ships, and though it will still provide the primary function of enabling passengers to access the Internet, it will offer much more. Twenty-six workstations are arranged to face a 56-inch flat-screen teaching monitor, where Apple-trained Celebrity techs will teach classes in producing photo books (iPhoto), editing videos (iMovie) and developing Web sites (iWeb). Apple will also provide the software and hardware for the workstations, as well as merchandise for a mini-store selling iPods, MacBooks and accessories. Techs will be available to assist passengers with hardware and software issues, including help accessing social media sites onboard. Windows workstations will also be available.

Arguably, the most dramatic new addition to Eclipse is the groundbreaking alternative restaurant, Qsine. It's the brainchild of Jacques Van Staden, Celebrity's Vice President of Culinary Operations. While most shipboard specialty restaurants fall into fairly well-defined genres -- French, Italian, Steaks & Seafood, Asian and the like -- Qsine takes commonplace or comfort foods and twists the recipe, presentation or both to live up to its slogan, "Uniquely Unordinary."

Order meatballs at Qsine, for example, and rather than the standard ground beef with tomato sauce, you get a trio: Kobe beef with cheddar and marinara, veal with mushrooms and marsala, and turkey meatballs with cranberry and sage gravy. Menu item "Popcorn Fish" is bite-sized battered and fried codfish served in a movie-theater popcorn box, while spring rolls come to the table impaled on bouncy metal springs. If you order guacamole, be prepared to work for your appetizer: it's a do-it-yourself affair, with avocado chunks brought to the table in a stone mortar and pestle. Sushi is formed into lollipops with soy/rice centers. In fact, there is only one dish on the entire menu that is served on a conventional plate!

Both the food and the ambience at Qsine are meant to be fun, a signal you get when you first walk into the room and see the overhead lighting: table lamps with ornate shades mounted upside down on the ceiling! Cover charge at Qsine is $40 per person.

Kid-Friendly Factor

Like Eclipse's restaurants and shops, kids' facilities are clustered, as well. Arranged around the forward mast are the basketball court, video arcade, Shipmates room (the play area for kids, ages 3 through 5), Fun Factory (for ages 6 through 11) and X-Club (a hangout for the 12 to 17 set). Whether it was by design or coincidence, the placement of this youth cluster is at the extreme opposite end of Deck 15 from the Lawn Club and Hot Glass Show, with a gulf of empty space extending down to the Lido Deck in between.

Organized activities are extensive, broken into five age-specific groups: Shipmates (3 - 5), Cadets (6 - 8), Ensigns (9 - 11), Tweens (12 - 14) and Teens (15 - 17).

On the accommodations side, Celebrity Eclipse offers a total of 418 cabins that will accommodate three or four persons, including the four Family Ocean View staterooms, and 121 cabins have connecting doors.

Huh?

Though it may seem bizarre, our choice for the "What Were They Thinking?" award is the same choice as one of our selections for "Nifty & New." How is this possible? It's like an actor getting a Best Actor Oscar and a Razzie (Worst Actor) Award for the same role in the same picture. Yet, it's true. We found that Qsine, while earning kudos for its trendy, cook-outside-the-box cuisine, fell flat on its face with certain choices where it appeared the chefs opted for cuteness and quirkiness at the expense of quality or functionality.

"Qsine Two examples:

While we get the fun concept of serving food in almost anything but conventional tableware, Qsine's "Crunchy Munchies" dish, a selection of deep-fried finger foods, is served in a narrow, pyramidal cardboard container, which won't stand up on its own and cannot be set down on the table without spilling the contents onto the tabletop.

The physical menu also needs a makeover. Instead of using a conventional paper menu, Chef Van Staden has decided to print Qsine's menu on a transparent glass panel, measuring about 6.5 inches square (pictured to the right: click image to view a larger version.) That panel sits in a tabletop housing with a switch that turns on a light, illuminating the menu from behind. Cute idea, but putting all the menu choices in such a small area reduces the menu to a confusing boilerplate.

Bottom Line

Celebrity nearly hit it out of the park with Solstice, the prototype for the current class, and Eclipse carries on the winning tradition. Like its two predecessors, its main strength lies in blending seemingly opposite qualities into a unified whole: it's a large ship, but it's still intimate; it carries a large passenger load but seldom feels crowded; and, most of all, it manages to be high-energy and high-class at the same time.

The problem for Celebrity is going to come when the last of the five Solstice-class ships has floated out, and that problem will be how to top them.

These ships will be a tough act to follow.

Cruise Critic

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